Dr. Claudio Roscini and Dr. Daniel Ruiz-Molina presented a BIST Ignite Project involving the ICN2 and IBEC

Dr. Claudio Roscini and Dr. Daniel Ruiz-Molina presented a BIST Ignite Project involving the ICN2 and IBEC

7 Nov 2019

The 2018 BIST Ignite Programme has awarded a project presented by Dr. Claudio Roscini and entitled: Artificial bacteria: a novel generation of bioinspired vaccines (BioVac). The project is a result of a combined effort between Nanosfun and the Bacterial Infection: Antimicrobial Therapy group led by Prof. Eduard Torrent (IBEC). On the one hand, Nanosfun will contribute with our experience in the synthesis, characterization and encapsulation with micro-/nanocapsules and in the manufacture of novel materials for the industry based on biocompatible coatings. On the second hand, the Torrent’s Group is a world reference in the development of new strategies to combat bacterial infections, via the development of artificial cells and biomimetic cell components in order to use these materials to prevent and treat infectious diseases.

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Project members: (from left to right) Ivana Cavaliere (PhD student at Nanosfun-ICN2), Dr. Claudio Roscini (Senior Postdoctoral Researcher at Naosfun-ICN2), Prof. Daniel Ruiz-Molina (CSIC Research Scientist and Group Leader of Nanosfun-ICN2), Prof. Eduard Torrents (Group Leader at IBEC), Dr. Maria del Mar Cendra Gascón (Postdoctoral Researcher at IBEC) and Laura Moya (PhD Student at IBEC).

Briefly, the BioVac Project hypothesize that capsules mimicking the size, shape and surface properties of bacteria can be used to deceive the immune system, making the body believe that we are administering the pathogens themselves to trigger an effective protective immune response (both humoral and cellular). As a proof-of-concept infections caused by S. aureus has been selected but a priori this universal approach can be used where traditional vaccines have not been able to effectively prevent the advance infectious pathologies or to prevent the growth and action of antimicrobial multiresistant (AMR) bacteria. Both are major health challenges that the worldwide society is facing nowadays.

Now we will have eight months to develop their projects, at which point they will be eligible to apply for additional funding through the second phase of the 2018 Ignite Programme.

There are also other four projects within the BIST Community awarded.

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